Some awesome wicked toy art by digital artist and designer Jason Freeny.

Using the power of his imagination, Freeny creates hypothetical skeleton structures and internal organs of iconic toys.

To see more of Jason’s work, including his digital prints, visit his website.

 

John Duvengar, he has some amazing illustrations and is a French artists that is living in Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. Enjoy his work and check out his portfolio! I particularly love the Rare Vintage Bots collection below.

I am going to start posting inspirational work that helps get my creative juices flowing – I am going to start this series with Vincent Hachen, a very talented digital artist and game designer based in Brazil. Check out his portfolio for some inspiration.

Imagine a wee little printer that sits on your desk that brings in snippets of news and fun things everyday! Or a to-do list that prints itself out so that you can just stick it in your journal. Or if you are a crossword fanatic a new crossword that prints out daily!

 

Meet Little Printer – its like having your own printing press within arms reach. The idea is awesome, I am a traditional print guy at heart and love having something tangible, having Little Printer is like having a mini mailman that delivers some printing goodness right to you and caters to your tastes.

 

This Little Printer is ready for some pre-orders, check it out at Berg.

This weekend I was looking for a new iPad game to purchase, I was getting bored playing the same old games over and over again that I had on my iPad. So I found this little gem of a game, highly addictive and got a lot of friends to also purchase the game.

Dungeon Crawlers is a new turn based strategy game from Drowning Monkeys, published by Ayopa games. This takes on the feel of a classic strategy game and for all your gamer nerds gives the feel of an old school Dungeons and Dragons hack-and-slash dungeon crawl adventure.

It is highly enjoyable with great characters and a little humor thrown in the mix. The game is very linear, and for me started out slow. The game does have some nice potential and I can only see it growing in the near future. Be sure to find all the secret levels in an area as they have new weapons and items that can help in your battles.

Pros: Tactical combat is amazing and very simple. Each character you manage during combat plays a vital role and you need to think tactically so that they team works together rather than against each other. The characters level up on their own, which I enjoy and hate tactical games where you have to micro-manage every single aspect of your character.

Cons: The game does crash a lot and I hope it is fixed with a few updates. Combat does move slowly and when you have to watch the enemies turn you want to just shoot yourself in the face, sometimes when there are a lot of enemies you can go make yourself some lunch and come back, I hope they fix this in an update. There is no way to revive a fallen hero in combat, which stinks, you can restart an encounter but when they take a half hour that kind of is annoying.

Overall: I give Dungeon Crawler 9 out of 10. I had a great time playing this game and I see extreme potential with future updates and I highly recommend this to anyone that likes the classic turn based strategy game.

While looking for some inspiration I stumbled upon Self Made Hero, an independent graphic novel publishing house that started in 2007, currently they have several Lovercraftian items on the illustration line. Looks like they did a comic adaptation of H.P. Lovecraft’s novella, Self Made Hero’s website, Culbard certainly captures the story in rich shadows and cool shades.

I am looking forward to getting my copy and checking out the other Lovecraft lines from the company.

This sounds like a cool photography Exhibition:

Read More here: http://www.carriehaddadgallery.com/index.cfm?method=Photography.Photographers

Opening Reception: Saturday July 18 from 6 to 8pm July 16, 2009through August 30, 2009

As a child, I always had trouble falling asleep. Nighttime was when I played out all my stories, in the dark, eyes tracing shapes, once familiar, but no longer recognized without light. Once I grabbed a flashlight, pressed it against my palm to make my skin glow red. I was 8 years old and extraterrestrial. In the large mirror across from my bed, my reflection burned brightly. I was glowing. A midnight inventor. That same flashlight would serve both as protector and accomplice – illuminating the dark recesses of my childhood room and pulling wild performances from my adolescent imagination. I wanted to always see something, even in the darkness.

What I didn’t have then was a way of recording this experience — fast forward to today, and I have the wonderful opportunity of presenting “Afterglow”, an exhibit of photographers creating and documenting light performances seen only by the eye of their camera. Using long exposures and small hand held lights — often just a cheap flashlight – these images have been noting ideas, emotions and sensations that traditional photographs cannot.

These alluring performances can start with the arc of a small light passing through the darkness or a series of momentary brisk swirls and flashes in the night. Ephemeral moments strung together to form a picture, alive only in the mind of the photographer until revealed later, whole, in the completed image. Who can refuse the power of these images? Or not identify with such shimmering, arrested moments. Whether describing the life force of a human body or that of a larger universe, the synapses of the mind, the afterglow of strong emotions, the electric spark jumping between bodies or centuries, these photographs offer up a clear expression of the photographer’s vision – emphasizing the instinctive bond between hand and brain.

The work of these photographers is vital and never still. Their images register something of what human life is and of what human life might be; present fully in every instant of time. The gleaming tracery evokes a gradual recognition of nose, mouth, chin, and neck coalescing into a recognizable form like “man”, or even an individual, like “Christopher”, but this body transcends those familiar, literal forms.  Alfred Stieglitz, a hundred years ago, believed that personality could not be expressed by a face alone. The work in this exhibit agrees; it attempts to further sensitize photography – extending the medium to take in more and more of life’s fleeting glow.

— Melissa Stafford, Curator

Starting a website to help your business or even to provide information should be done right and can involve many factors. Below are some items you should consider and have some understanding of.

Domain name: You need an address for people to go to, do some research and investigation on possible domain names for your site. If the obvious is taken think of the next best solution. Your domain name is very important and you want something that customers or visitors can remember. But it should also reflect your business name or your product and services.

Target Audience/Market: Who is your target audience and what is your goal with the site. Your website should speak to your audience and get them to do what they came there for.

Design: Crucial in the look and feel of the site, you may think you can design something – but there is more to design than getting a template and implementing it. There are some crucial factors that go into web design.

Content: Your information and how it is presented is very important. Are you trying to get people to buy stuff or are you providing information. It is key that you have a professional write your content, don’t just pull content from other marketing material you may have. It just won’t sound professional.

Hosting: Your site has to be somewhere on the web. Locate a company who can provide you excellent customer service, remember you pay for what you get.

Marketing: You should have a plan in place. How are you going to get people to your site, both online and offline. You should consider Search Engine Marketing and other marketing for your site. If you spend all this money on your site what good is it if no one can find you in the Google sandbox.

As a Web Designer and a Project Manager for a web design company I see a lot of mistakes on the web that people make. Let me share with you my 8 deadly web design mistakes that many designers make:

1. Building the website entirely with frames or Flash. This really complicates things and makes the website not user friendly – along with long loading time with Flash. There will be no unique URL to identify every page and some people might not have Flash player installed which can cause more headaches in the long run.

2. Too much animations and graphics. This will slow down the loading time of the website. People have very short tolerance towards websites that load very slowly. This can also be very distracting if things are not organized well – people are looking for information and want it fast and easy to find.

3. No navigation support or user-friendliness. You cannot expect visitors to figure out how to navigate through your site. You may find it easy to navigate, but visitors may not – there should not be instructions on what to do when you get to the site, it should just be natural. This will cause them to abandon your site and visit other websites if they can not understand the workings of your navigation.

4. No standardization. The look and feel should be the same across every page. Style sheets are key in helping with consistency throughout the web – don’t neglect them.

5. All pages should have a way to get back to the home page. People may enter your site through other page other than the home page (portfolio or services pages for example). Its as simple as having ‘home’ on the navigation or a small icon on the upper right hand corner.

6. Not enough or outdated information. Content is king when it comes to online commerce. If you want to do business online, you must have solid content. Also writing for the web is an art – you should consider hiring someone to write the content for your site rather than trying to chop and piece together content from other marketing materials that you already have. A website with outdated content and non-professional content will not attract visitors, and people will not take you seriously. To keep things fresh and alive on your site you should also consider adding a blog of some sorts.

7. You should avoid Horizontal scrolling bar – unless your design concept requires it.

8. Never testing in multiple versions of browsers. Your website may appear fine in Internet Explorer but not on Firefox. Make sure that you spend a little time testing your website for browsers compatibility. For browser statistics check out: http://www.w3schools.com/browsers/browsers_stats.asp

Your website is an asset to you and your business so make sure that you treat it seriously. Your site should be a part of your overall marketing plan – not just something that you have because everyone else does. Spend the time, money and energy in making it one of your best sales tools and marketing pieces.